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Monday, 05 April 2021 00:00

Tips for Foot Care During Pregnancy

The additional weight of carrying a baby can often lead to a variety of foot related conditions for pregnant women. One of the most common occurrences in pregnant women is painful and swollen feet that result from excess fluids. In order to reduce this swelling it is important to raise the feet as often as possible, along with wearing wide and comfortable shoes and not crossing the legs. Pregnancy can also lead to pain in the arch of the foot. Stretching in the morning, as well as before and after exercise can help ease this pain. Supportive low-heeled shoes can also help the arch of the foot. Ingrown toenails can also occur due to the feet swelling. Wearing wider shoes can help prevent ingrown toenails too, but should one develop it is important to be seen and treated by a podiatrist. If you are pregnant and struggling with foot related issues, consulting with a podiatrist can be beneficial to learn various tips and tricks. 

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Pregnancy and Foot Health
Monday, 29 March 2021 00:00

How Do I Prevent Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

If you are diabetic, then you’ve likely heard about diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). DFUs are wounds that form on the feet and heal poorly and very slowly. Because diabetes is associated with a loss of sensation and poor circulation in the feet, you may not feel these wounds when they first form. DFUs can develop anywhere on the feet or toes, but they most frequently appear on the soles of the feet, where they often go unnoticed until they produce symptoms such as fluid drainage. To avoid a surprising and painful discovery on the bottoms of your feet, it is important to take preventive measures. Wash your feet daily in warm, soapy water and dry them thoroughly. Moisturize the bottoms of the feet to avoid dry skin, which can crack and lead to wounds. Inspect your feet daily for any abnormalities, including new cuts, scrapes, sores, pain, or discoloration. If you find anything unusual, consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Diabetic Foot Care

Sever’s disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis, is an overuse injury of the growth plate in the heel. This condition is common among active children between the ages of 8 and 14. While the child is still growing, the growth plates in their heel bones are vulnerable to injury and inflammation. This is often caused by participating in repetitive activities that put excess strain on the heels, such as the running and jumping common in sports like soccer or basketball. Sever’s disease is also more common in children who are overweight, as the extra weight can put pressure on the heels. Symptoms of Sever’s disease include heel pain, swelling, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected foot. If your child complains of heel pain, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 15 March 2021 00:00

What Is Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome?

Tendons, blood vessels, and nerves—such as the tibial nerve which provides feeling and mobility in the foot—travel through the tarsal tunnel in the ankle. When the tibial nerve gets constricted or damaged, Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome can occur. This condition produces tingling or numbness, pain, and a weakening in muscles and various parts of the foot. It can be triggered by swelling, abnormal growths in bones and joints, varicose veins, abnormal arches, and various systemic diseases. A complete recovery is possible if the condition is diagnosed and treated in its early stages. To avoid permanent complications such as pain, numbness, and immobility, it is suggested to consult with a podiatrist who can provide a variety of treatments and therapies.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Sunday, 14 March 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 08 March 2021 00:00

What Can Cause Poor Circulation in Feet?

When poor circulation, or reduced blood flow affects your lower limbs, you may notice your feet feeling cold or numb and your skin turning red, blue, purple, or white. You may also notice dry skin, hair loss on the legs or feet, weakened toenails, and slow wound healing. There are many possible causes for poor circulation in the feet. Both Raynaud’s disease and acrocyanosis cause blood vessels in the extremities to constrict, leading to reduced blood flow and the affected area becoming cold, numb, and discolored. Diabetes damages the blood vessels, affecting circulation. Arteriosclerosis, in which the arteries harden due to plaque buildup, and peripheral artery disease, which occurs when arteriosclerosis progresses without treatment, are also very common culprits of impaired blood flow to the feet. If you have the symptoms of poor circulation in your feet, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

Types of Corns on the Feet

A corn on the foot is a small area of hardened skin that typically develops as a result of excess friction. They can develop from wearing shoes and socks that do not fit correctly. Soft corns can form between the toes and can remain moist as they rub against the neighboring toes. This type of corn can cause severe pain and can alter the gait to compensate for the discomfort. Hard corns can form on the outside of the pinky toe, or on the sole of the foot. These can develop from standing for the majority of the day, in addition to having aging feet. One potential treatment option is wearing the correct shoes in order to eliminate a portion of the friction on the corn. Corns can be quite painful, and it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist about how to prevent and treat corns on the feet.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses

Wearing the right size shoe is very important in order to keep your feet healthy and free of foot problems. When looking for the right shoes, there should be about a half an inch between the big toe and the end of the shoe when checking the fit while sitting. This is because the foot will shift in the shoe while standing. Second, make sure to wear the same type of socks while shopping that you plan to wear with the shoes. It is also helpful to shop for shoes in the afternoon because the feet expand over the course of the day. If you find a pair of shoes that you really like but they are slightly too big, wearing insoles is a way to help them fit properly as well. If you have other questions about how to make sure your shoes have the best fit for you, please consult with a podiatrist.

Finding a properly-fitting shoe is important in reducing injuries and preventing foot problems. For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Proper Shoe Fitting

A common concern when it comes to foot health, having properly fitted shoes can help prevent injuries to the foot. Out feet affect our posture and gait, which in turn affects the biomechanics and overall bodily structure. With 33 joints, 26 bones, and over 100 ligaments, the potential for serious injury is much greater than one realizes. Although the feet cease growth in adulthood, they still change shape as they mature. Here are some factors to consider when it comes to investing in proper fitting shoes:

  • Be sure the shoes fit correctly right away
  • Ensure the ball of your foot fits comfortably in the widest portion of the shoes
  • Even though they may look fashionable, improper fitting shoes can either create adverse conditions or exacerbate existing ones you may already have
  • Walk along a carpeted surface to ensure the shoes comfortably fit during normal activity

Keeping in mind how shoes fit the biomechanics of your body, properly-fitting shoes are vitally important. Fortunately, it is not difficult to acquire footwear that fits correctly. Be sure to wear shoes that support the overall structure of your body. Do your feet a favor and invest in several pairs of well-fitted shoes today.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Proper Shoe Fitting
Monday, 15 February 2021 00:00

Signs Your Child May Have an Ingrown Toenail

An ingrown toenail is defined as the nail on the big toe growing into the surrounding skin. Parents may notice their child is limping as this condition develops. In severe cases, it can cause difficulty walking, and may be beneficial to seek immediate treatment. Ingrown toenails can cause severe pain and discomfort, and often occur due to wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely. Additionally, genetic factors may contribute to the onset of an ingrown toenail. The symptoms patients can experience can include redness, swelling, extreme tenderness, and a yellow discharge oozing from the affected area. If you notice your child has any of these symptoms, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can effectively treat ingrown toenails. 

 

Ingrown toenails may initially present themselves as a minor discomfort, but they may progress into an infection in the skin without proper treatment. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails are caused when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the soft flesh surrounding it. They often result in redness, swelling, pain, and in some cases, infection. This condition typically affects the big toe and may recur if it is not treated properly.

Causes

  • Improper toenail trimming
  • Genetics
  • Improper shoe fitting
  • Injury from pedicures or nail picking
  • Abnormal gait
  • Poor hygiene

You are more likely to develop an ingrown toenail if you are obese, have diabetes, arthritis, or have any fungal infection in your nails. Additionally, people who have foot or toe deformities are at a higher risk of developing an ingrown toenail.

Symptoms

Some symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness, swelling, and pain. In rare cases, there may be a yellowish drainage coming from the nail.

Treatment

Ignoring an ingrown toenail can have serious complications. Infections of the nail border can progress to a deeper soft-tissue infection, which can then turn into a bone infection. You should always speak with your podiatrist if you suspect you have an ingrown toenail, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenail Care
Friday, 12 February 2021 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

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