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November 2021

Tuesday, 30 November 2021 00:00

Why Heel Spurs Form

Heel Spurs are calcium deposits that form on the bottom of the heel near the arch. This area of the foot is referred to as the plantar fascia. Heel spurs can occur when the heel bone and plantar fascia are exposed to repeated stress. This type of stress can be due to over-stretching the plantar fascia, habitual tearing of the heel bone’s thin lining, and straining ligaments and muscles in the feet. The stress in this area usually also causes plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of the plantar fascia). Because heel spurs are not always painful, and usually occur along with plantar fasciitis, they can often go undetected. Symptomatic heel spurs can create a sharp pain, inflammation and tenderness, and feel warm to the touch. People who are obese, older, or who wear improper footwear, are more at risk of developing heel spurs, as well as those who participate in activities such as running and jumping repeatedly, or who suffer from osteoarthritis. A podiatrist will typically use X-rays to identify and diagnose heel spurs. If you believe you may have heel spurs, make an appointment with a podiatrist for an examination and analysis of your condition.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Tuesday, 23 November 2021 00:00

Nerve Pain Between the Toes

Morton’s neuroma is caused by irritation or damage to a nerve in the foot. It typically affects the nerve between the third and fourth toes and causes a shooting, stabbing, or burning pain, as well as an odd sensation of walking on a pebble. Morton’s neuroma can also cause tingling and numbness in the foot. Symptoms may get worse while moving your foot, bearing weight, or wearing high heels or tight shoes. This condition tends to worsen without treatment. If you are suffering from pain in the ball of the foot, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Fractures in the toes and metatarsals (long bones in the midfoot that connect to the toe bones) can be quite painful and should not be taken lightly. Breaks can either be traumatic (acute) that occur instantly due to an injury, or can be stress fractures which develop over time. Traumatic fractures can cause a bone to become misaligned in certain cases. You may hear a snap at the moment of impact and you may even notice that the toe is crooked or misshapen in some way. Pain may be felt at the site of the injury, and bruising and swelling may occur the following day. With a stress fracture, any pain felt while using the affected foot may subside when you rest, and although you may notice swelling there should be no apparent bruising. It is important to see a podiatrist for any broken bone in your toe or metatarsal, even if you have been treated initially at an emergency room. Proper treatment and rehabilitation will help avoid future complications like an improperly healed bone, mobility issues, difficulty wearing shoes, deformities, chronic pain, or arthritis in the joint.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

Heel Pain Can Be Treated!

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

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The tarsal tunnel is a narrow passageway on the inside of the ankle that is made of a thick band of fibrous tissue (flexor retinaculum) and ankle bones. Veins, arteries, muscles, tendons, and the tibial nerve pass through the tarsal tunnel. Certain conditions such as a ganglion cyst, nerve sheath tumors, fibrosis, and even injuries can tighten the already-narrow space within the tunnel and compress the tibial nerve. This can cause burning pain or tingling (paresthesias) along the tibial nerve, the inside of the ankle, or bottom (plantar) part of the foot. If you are experiencing this type of discomfort, contact a podiatrist. They will perform a physical examination and may suggest that an MRI be performed to visualize lesions that may be present within the tunnel. Both conservative and surgical treatments will be considered depending on the cause and severity of the condition and will focus on reducing pressure on the nerve and relieving pain.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Richard DiMario of Maine. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 02 November 2021 00:00

The Two Types of Flat Feet

Flat feet, or pes planus, is a condition where there is no visible arch in the foot. There are two types of flat feet: flexible and rigid. Flexible flat feet will have a visible arch when the foot is elevated, however that will disappear when weight is applied to the foot. Typically, flexible flat foot is asymptomatic, and it is believed to be a genetic condition. In rigid flat foot, the arch is never present—even when the foot is elevated. Rigid flat foot can be due to joint or bone disorders, which may be genetic. This type of flat foot can be problematic and cause gait disorders as well as pain in the arch, ankle, heel, and outside of the foot. If you have any discomfort in your feet due to flat feet, make an appointment with a podiatrist who can examine your feet and go over treatment options specific to your condition.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Richard DiMario from Maine. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in York, ME . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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